Comments 4

  1. Stanley Sussman says:

    The simplest solution would be to set commission rates for both the seller agent and the buyer agent. While this is true what other industry discloses their commission rates to the consumer? the auto industry? the appliance store? None of them do that. We are the only one industry that discloses our commission in the closing papers. Yet, most buyers tell me they know the commission is 6%, without anyone telling them, how is that?

  2. Roger Weaver says:

    These plaintiffs would never have created this lawsuit if this were a Buyer’s Market. It would have been difficult for them to make the huge profits on the sale of their houses, and they could have been happy to get an agent, any agent, to bring them a buyer, and they’d be happy to pay them. In fact, they would have had issue with their listing agent who’d be helpless in a severe Buyer’s Market.

    • Frank Jacovini says:

      So true. It’s the regulatory atmosphere in Washington right now. Make your investment in RPAC.

  3. Javier Diaz says:

    The concept of elasticity seems to be at play and at the center of the argument presented on both side. A solution, as Stanley proposes, is to regulate and settle the commission rates according to supply and demand at one point in time, up for revision as the market switches from a buyer’s to a seller’s market and let us periodically revise them accordingly. In addition, we could consider commission structure based on the price of the home.

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